Creativity up close

May 7
|
9:50 a.m.–10:25 a.m. CDT (UTC-5)
Featured in the Confab on-demand video library

Creativity is part of every human brain, and a central part of our humanity.  Where does this wellspring of inventiveness come from?

Drawing on The Runaway Species: How Humans Remake the World, the book he co-authored with neuroscientist David Eagleman, composer Anthony Brandt will explore the biological and social underpinnings of creativity and describe a framework for how new ideas evolve.

Knitting together the sciences and the arts, he will use a host of audio and visual examples to make visible the cognitive tools shared across disciplines. Finally, Dr. Brandt will argue that creativity should be nurtured in everyone and offer practical strategies for doing so.

In this talk, we’ll learn how:

  • Creativity is a natural, normal, and healthy part of human mental life.
  • New ideas don’t appear out of “thin air:” We build on prior experience to create the new.
  • Ideas evolve thanks to shared cognitive mechanisms.
  • Creativity should be nurtured and cultivated in everyone—especially in the young.

Who will benefit most: This talk is for everyone, from parents and educators to lifelong learners.

Anthony BrandtAnthony Brandt

Professor, Rice University

Creativity up close

Creativity is part of every human brain, and a central part of our humanity.  Where does this wellspring of inventiveness come from?

Drawing on The Runaway Species: How Humans Remake the World, the book he co-authored with neuroscientist David Eagleman, composer Anthony Brandt will explore the biological and social underpinnings of creativity and describe a framework for how new ideas evolve.

Knitting together the sciences and the arts, he will use a host of audio and visual examples to make visible the cognitive tools shared across disciplines. Finally, Dr. Brandt will argue that creativity should be nurtured in everyone and offer practical strategies for doing so.

In this talk, we’ll learn how:

  • Creativity is a natural, normal, and healthy part of human mental life.
  • New ideas don’t appear out of “thin air:” We build on prior experience to create the new.
  • Ideas evolve thanks to shared cognitive mechanisms.
  • Creativity should be nurtured and cultivated in everyone—especially in the young.

Who will benefit most: This talk is for everyone, from parents and educators to lifelong learners.

Anthony BrandtAnthony Brandt

Professor, Rice University